mobile phone, Nantwich police

Police chiefs in Cheshire say they are “astonished” after an operation caught more than 300 motorists in one month using their mobile phone.

Officers issued 318 Traffic Offence Reports (TORs) to motorists for using their mobile phone behind the wheel in February – that’s a massive rise from 32 issued in February last year.

Their crackdown was part of a National Police Chief Council’s country-wide campaign.

Officers targeted drivers using a mobile phone behind the wheel and other Fatal 5 offences such as careless driving, speeding, drink/drug driving, and not wearing a seatbelt.

Chief Inspector Rob Dickinson, Cheshire’s Roads and Crime Unit said: “The fact that officers have issued more than 300 TORs throughout the month is astonishing.

“I have no doubt in my mind everyone knows the dangers of using their phones behind the wheel, and that they shouldn’t be doing it, yet so many people still do.

“Many people try and hide it down by their laps in a bid to avoid being caught.

“My question to those motorists who thought it was acceptable to use their mobile phone while driving and put other innocent road users lives at risk is, ‘was that call, text, DM, or scroll of your social media news feed really worth it’?”

David Keane, Police and Crime Commissioner for Cheshire, added: “Using a phone whilst driving is completely irresponsible.

“Not only does it put the lives of the driver themselves at risk, it also risks the lives of other road users and pedestrians.

“Scrolling through social media or checking a text message is not worth the loss of someone’s life or a lengthy prison sentence.

“I am pleased that Cheshire Police took part in the national operation and as a result stopped so many people from continuing their journeys while putting other road users at risk.”

2 Comments

  1. Carl says:

    Doesn’t surprise me at all. Only the other day I followed a van, swerving all over the road, probably texting or tweeting. If he or she got to there destination without causing any carnage, I’d be very surprised.

  2. John says:

    I quote “Officers targeted drivers using a mobile phone behind the wheel and other Fatal 5 offences such as careless driving, speeding, drink/drug driving, and not wearing a seatbelt.” “Speeding” is always used as a cause of deaths on our road, but “Speeding” needs to be defined. The actual number of deaths and seriously injured through Exceeding the speed is very low, about 4% in the Government statistics.
    To use the general term “Speeding” is misleading, is 31mph in a 30mph speeding?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website, to learn more please read our privacy policy.

*

Captcha * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.